Tuesday, August 25, 2009

August 25 - Genesius, Actor, Martyr, Convert

Genesius was not raised in a Christian family but he was a member of a class of people who were not highly esteemed or respected--actors and comedians. He sacrificed to the Roman gods and said all the right things but the Roman world seemed to offer him no opportunities to attain its great reward of wealth and a life of leisure and influence. Diocletian had made it clear that it would not be profitable--or even safe--to be a Christian but he had not been very clear on how anybody else could attain the rewards of the Empire. Genesius was an enterprising man and deduced that Diocletian would be making a rare trip to Rome to celebrate the 20th year of his rule and devised a plan. Knowing Diocletian's hatred of Christians, he endeavored to work with his troupe and develop an improvisational comedy act mocking Christians and their rites. He expected that this would convince the Emperor to smile upon him and earn him the rewards of the Empire and so he cast himself in the role of the main character with the intention of viciously satirizing Christian practice.

Using his skills as an actor, Genesius was able to become involved in Christian circles to perform the research necessary to do the act well. He was taking significant risk to do so--Christians were being persecuted and arrested--but he knew that he could always offer sacrifice quickly if captured and keep his freedom. Genesius convinced the Christian leaders that he was sincere and began to be educated by them about what it was they believed and trusted. While a catechumen of the Church, he learned about the Church's mysteries and rites--including baptism. The idea of sacramental rebirth by water intrigued Genesius who decided to focus the act upon this rite in particular. After he had received enough information to do the show, he stopped attending the meetings and classes of the people he had duped.

On the day of the show, the troupe was excited because Diocletian was present for the performance. Knowing that he loved comedy, the troupe knew that Diocletian's amusement meant their success and benefit. They took the stage and the mockery commenced much to Diocletian's delight. Genesius played a Christian in the catechumenate and his fellow actors played the stereotypes and comedic parts to the hilt. Subtle and not-so-subtle satire of the Christians pleased Diocletian as the actors must have been aware as they performed. Genesius--in character--requested baptism and an actor playing a priest came out from the wings of the stage area. Much laughter accompanied the baptism of Genesius but something changed as the water left the priest's bowl and poured over Genesius' head. Genesius saw a vision and all of his catechumenate came to bear upon his soul. He found himself painfully aware that he was mocking something that had taken seen in his heart and that he found himself truly to believe. He was being converted even as he mocked his newfound Lord and Savior. He had professed his faith in mockery but now it was made real as he found that the seed of faith planted by his time with the Christians had bloomed within him.

Actors playing soldiers came forward and gripped Genesius by the shoulders. They noticed that something had changed about Genesius' demeanor who had stopped delivering lines and, instead, was staring into space at some unseen vision. They continued on with the play likely thinking that Genesius was planning some particular gag or, perhaps, in accordance with the maxim: "the show must go on." They dragged him before the feet of Diocletian in the audience and presented him to the Emperor. Thinking it hilarious and excited to have a part in the show, Diocletian demanded the same of Genesius as he had demanded of so many Christians--denial of their faith and sacrifice to the Roman gods. Genesius looked up into the face of Diocletian and said, "I can deny neither my faith nor my Lord Jesus Christ." Nervous laughter stole through the crowd and Diocletian looked to his aides with confusion in his eyes--he didn't get it. The other actors froze knowing that Genesius had left the script--he was supposed to have agreed to the Emperor's demands and make a mockery of all that had preceded and been said.

Diocletian did not like that he thought a joke was being played on him and so he had soldiers--real soldiers--come out and bind Genesius before the crowd. It may not be funny but he refused to allow some actor to rob him of his dignity and aura of fear and adoration. He demanded Genesius' denial under threat of torture as audience and acting troupe looked on. Genesius responded: "There's nothing you can do or threaten to remove Jesus Christ from my heart and my mouth. Once I mocked his holy name and now I detest and regret that time. I came so late to the Kingdom and cannot leave it now." On Diocletian's order, Genesius was beheaded and made a martyr. He had not received the rewards of Rome but he had received the rewards of the Kingdom of God. He had earned the Martyr's Crown.

1 comment:

The Fraternity of St Genesius said...

THE FRATERNITY OF ST GENESIUS
LOG ON AND PRAY FOR AN ACTOR!

WWW.STGENESIUS.COM

Pray for all actors, pray for all those involved in theatre and cinema, or pray for a particular actor of your choice.

At a time when the arts and media
have such an important role to play in society, we have a
responsibility to pray for all those who work in these areas. We
need an explosion of grace in these times, we need hope and we need a new vision: we need to be brought back to God.

The arts and media can help modern men and women look again to faith and move towards the vision which Christ offers us; but those in the arts and media must be reminded of this mission, they must be supported and encouraged: the followers of Jesus Christ are the ones who must remind them and support them, and we can begin this with our prayer for them. Their patron, St Genesius the actor, asks us to
intercede with him for them.”

Join us in our mission of prayer.
Become a member, make a commitment to pray!

www.stgenesius.com